Especially for Grant Writers – a Poem

On this day – Haiku Tuesday – the Nonprofit Geek will now present to you a poem especially for Grant Writers. If there had been room for an extra line, I would have added that it is also important to get the nonprofit team to give Grant Writers information long before the application deadline. Please enjoy this haiku poem:


11 Haiku Tuesday


Nonprofits: Forget About “Better Late Than Never”

Last week the Greater Good Geek blog focused on nonprofit researcher Penelope Burk’s findings. This week “The Geek” will highlight another of Burk’s ‘best practices’ in writing thank you letters to donors – which can be summed up in two words:

Be prompt.

Burk conducts surveys of those who donate to nonprofit organizations. Getting a prompt thank you note is something donors do expect. Burk’s research on thank you letters, by the way, culminated in a list of the 20 Characteristics of Great Thank You Letters which was published in Burk’s Donor-Centered Fundraising.

But donors’ expectations is just one reason to be prompt. Another reason comes from the IRS. They state that a donor is required to “keep a contemporaneous written acknowledgment for a charitable contribution.” That key word – contemporaneous – essentially means “be prompt.”

Mentioning the IRS is always a good excuse to point you to their handy Charitable Contributions Guide for Tax Exempt Organizations. “The Geek” suggests having this guide at your fingertips and reviewing it periodically.

So because the Greater Good Geek is always looking for fun ways to remember nonprofit best practices, here is a haiku poem to remind you of this important thank you note element. Have a great #HaikuTuesday as well!

10 Haiku Tuesday


One proven tip for thank you notes to donors

Nonprofit researcher Penelope Burk has written extensively about fundraiser best practices, including “donor-centered thank you letters.” Today’s “Greater Good Geek Nonprofit Haiku Tip” focuses on one of these proven tips for a great thank you note. In fact, here is more info on and the citation for Burk’s research (check out number 9 – the inspiration for today’s poem).

9 Haiku Tuesday