PanelPicker Submissions: SXSW and SXSW EDU 2019

Hello!

Greater Good Strategies has submitted Meet Up applications to SXSW and SXSW EDU 2019 via their PanelPicker® process.

Please check out these proposal videos – and vote! Please tell your friends and make comments in the comment section. Thank you.

Here are the links: Nonprofit and Social Sector Meet Up and Educators Who Tweet Meet Up

Meet Up: Nonprofit and Social Sector

(PanelPicker® application for SXSW 2019)

SXSW is for those who think, dream, move, and create. So are nonprofits! Bring your ideas and questions to this meet-up of nonprofiteers.

The people you meet here will have ideas, answers and most of all empathy and support for the hard work you do. We’ll provide a framework and activities for networking – to ensure you connect with those from around the globe who can help and inspire you as you strive to improve your communities.

Whether you call it working for nonprofits, charities, NGOs, CSOs, or social good – come be uplifted by people like you who are making the world a better place.

Meet Up: Educators who Tweet

(PanelPicker® application for SXSW EDU 2019)

 

Twitter can help you teach, learn and engage. Educators have used Twitter to connect with other teachers, as a learning network and as part of lesson plans. How have you used twitter? Let’s Meetup and exchange tweeting ideas and best practices. Got a hashtag or chat you love? Let’s share. Come, and you just might see someone in real life who you’ve met on Twitter.

 

Credits Video Images: Phelps, Explee, Rodman, Community Archives, Ioachim, Bibliothèque de Toulouse. Levy.

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Award-winning Poems About Nonprofits

For Nonprofit Geeks, like me, who follow the excellent and super-funny blog about nonprofit life titled “Nonprofit with Balls” (NWB), you know that this week the “Nonprofit Poet Laureate of the Milky Way Galaxy” was crowned. Some background: NWB (written by Vu Le) had a nonprofit poetry contest this spring. Over 250 poems were submitted; 15 were picked for awards (and the top poet was deemed Nonprofit Poet Laureate of the Milky Way Galaxy). I encourage you to read the results. They truly are top-caliber; ready for a literary magazine or a liberal arts college poetry class or an emotional movie montage.

I entered the contest. Though I did not win, place or show – I will share the entry here. One note: a running joke in the NWB blog is that hummus is a staple at nonprofit events and functions. I thought by including a running joke, I would win favor with the judges. (Nope).

If you want to be inspired and moved, read the winning entries. Alternatively, read the poem below.

My Dog
My dog runs to greet me at the door when I come home.
Does he seem so happy because I submitted a 36-page grant application on time?
Or because I successfully executed a mail merge for a fundraising appeal?
Or because I typed the monthly board minutes in record speed?
Does my dog show me so much love because he knows I am trying to save the world?
No.
My dog knows not the cares of the nonprofit staffer.
He only knows that I feed him, I walk him…
And I smell like hummus.

-Susannah Erler

P.S. You should know that I don’t actually have a dog. Including a dog was another (unsuccessful) attempt to win favor with the judges.

15315494043_9044d98949_m.jpg

Photo: National Library of Australia, 1910

 

3 Austin Resources for Strengthening Your Nonprofit Organization

When you think of people who chose to work for nonprofit organizations, what comes to mind? You probably picture someone with a big heart.

big heart

But a big heart is not the only requirement to for helping others. If you fill your brain with tips and specialized nonprofit knowledge, you can help even more people. There are a number of organizations in Austin that provide excellent assistance to community sector professionals. But there are three that I “geek out” at when I visit them or take a class from them – and I think you will too.

Center for Nonprofit Studies at Austin Community College (CNS @ ACC)

Check out CNS @ ACC’s web site for their list of services. But as a nonprofit geek, I’d like to focus here on their learning opportunities. I have enjoyed offerings such as grant writing, social media, and team-building. One thing I like is that they have classes of various lengths and price-ranges. I have seen free brown bag lunchtime offerings and I have seen multi-week classes culminating in a certificate. There is something for every nonprofit professional at CNS @ ACC.

The Regional Foundation Library (RFL) at the University of Texas at Austin

Do you ever wonder what the secret to obtaining grant funding is? Stopping by the RFL is the first step toward finding out. For more than 50 years, the RFL has served as a bridge between the grant-seeking and the grant-making communities. The staff at the RFL can answer your questions about ways to approach grant giving organizations. But this geek’s favorite tool at the RFL is the Foundation Directory Online Database. You can use it to search for the foundations that are most likely to give you grants. The RFL staff can coach you on the best way to use the Foundation Directory Online and their other free tools.

Greenlights

Greenlights’ mission is to strengthen nonprofits for extraordinary performance and impact. This 501(c)3 organization provides management consulting services, professional development, customized training, in-depth research and more. Visit their site for examples of what you can learn; but one example of a recent Greenlights research report is On the Verge: Value and Vulnerability of Austin’s Nonprofit Sector. This study reports the surprising facts that: Austin is home to nearly 6,000 nonprofits – but 72% have less than $100K in income – and less than 15% have ANY paid staff.

If you start building your knowledge of how to help a nonprofit organization succeed, then visit any or all of these resources – and tell them the Greater Good Geek sent you.

brain

Fill your brain with information about nonprofit organizations Resources:

Center for Nonprofit Studies at Austin Community College (formerly known as Center for Community Based and Nonprofit Organizations – CCBNO): 5930 Middle Fiskville Rd, #414, Austin, TX 78752, (512) 223-7051; http://sites.austincc.edu/npo/

The Regional Foundation Library: At UT’s Community Engagement Center, 1009 East 11th St., Austin, TX. A call is recommended before visiting: (512) 475-7373′ http://ddce.utexas.edu/foundationlibrary/

Greenlights (formerly known as Greenlights for Nonprofit Success): 8303 N MoPac Expy Suite A201, Austin, Texas 78759, (512) 477-5955; http://www.greenlights.org/

Questions:

Have you used any of these resources? If so, what did you think? Are there other resources that you have found helpful?

Image Credits: S. Erler (first image); Internet Archive Book Images (second image).

Ever heard of a Nonprofit Geek?

Many of you know computer geeks or math geeks. But have you ever met a nonprofit geek?

“Just what do you mean by a ‘nonprofit geek’?”

Picture the computer geeks you know – what are they like? They could spend hours thinking about computers, right? The math geeks could tell you the difference between the K Theory and the Algebraic K Theory. (I agree: snore).

They know their stuff

The bottom line is, just like the other geeks you know, nonprofit geeks know their stuff – about nonprofit organizations.

Geek Images

And what other images does the word geek bring up for you? Are you picturing a smooth Casanova used car salesperson-type. No way!

Not a wolf in sheep’s clothing

wolfinsheepsclothing

A geek is someone who is most interested in facts, truth and accuracy – and being approachable about it. Once you got to know those geeks in high school, they turned out to be nice, welcoming and loyal, didn’t they? Plus, if you invited them to a party they would help you with your homework too.

Like trusted scouts

So a nonprofit geek is an approachable expert about the community sector – someone who wants to be helpful.

Scouts

Image Credits: J.W. Barber (first image); Adolph B. Rice Studio (second image).

Blog questions: what do you think of when you hear “nonprofit geek?” Do you imagine someone helpful and knowledgeable? Have you ever known a nonprofit geek? And if so, what were they like?